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PowerChute Network Shutdown for UNIX/Linux is not running shell scripts/command

Issue:
How to run and troubleshoot scripts / command files with PowerChute Network Shutdown on Unix/Linux

Product Line:
PowerChute Network Shutdown

Environment:
All supported Unix and Linux OS

Cause:
Informational

Solution:

Note: If you are having problems getting a command script to work using a supported 64 bit processor and operating system, please make sure you follow the install procedure specific for 64 bit systems as listed in the PowerChute Network Shutdown Installation Manual.

Shell Scripts in a UNIX/Linux environment are basically a series of commands and instructions that are stored to a file so that all of the commands & instructions can be run at once by executing that file. Typically, the file is run by a specified shell or some other interpreter. Usually in a UNIX/Linux environment, the first line of a script specifies the interpreter or shell that is intended to run the script. The bourne shell, for instance, is usually located at the following absolute path:
/bin/sh

Therefore, scripts that are written to be run by the bourne shell will normally begin with the following line:
#!/bin/sh

Scripts that are to be run by PowerChute Network Shutdown need to be written in the Bourne Shell and should start with a line that resembles the line above. Thus the first thing that needs to be verified when a script is not being run properly by PowerChute Network Shutdown is that the script is written for the Bourne Shell. The second thing that needs to be verified is that the Bourne Shell is being called properly in the first line of the script. It is important to keep in mind that if the script is not setup properly, it may run correctly when executed manually at the shell prompt.

The following is an example of a script that will output the words "This is a command file test." to a file called test.txt in the root directory:
echo "This is a command file test." >> /test.txt

If this file were saved with the file name scr.sh and given executable rights, when it was run from the shell prompt, a file would be created in the root directory called test.txt that contained the words "This is a command file test." If the script were to be run by PowerChute Network Shutdown, this is how it should look:

#!/bin/sh
echo "This is a command file test." >> /test.txt

Notice here, that the first line of the script specifies that /bin/sh is going to be used to execute the commands in the script. Once this change has been made to the script, it should execute from PowerChute Network Shutdown properly.
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